American Clockmaker

David and I stayed pretty busy during the winter visit. Although, I think he’s been busy his entire life. Given that he completed his first clock at 27 years of age, just after completing a home he built from scratch. By 25, David had built parts for over 650 clocks and finished about 500 of them while working under master clockmaker Gerhard Hartwigs, who taught him the trade.

While gathering materials in the workshop, we found a stack of old photos. This one was hiding in the pile and shows David and his daughter Ashley next to the first clock he built after the passing of Mr. Hartwigs.

David and his daughter in his home with wife his Becky

Here are some of the resident clocks at the Lindow home he’s made over the years. They are some fine examples of beautiful craftsmanship.

davidhome1

The case was made by John Bartron of Honesdale, PA and is made from local cherry. It’s a reproduction of the clock that resides in the Wayne County Historical Society.

phildial

davdhome2

Roxbury style Mahogany tall clock: Case by Robert Materne, who has made clocks for both  Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Dial and movement by David Lindow (soon to be replaced with a painted dial, appropriate for the case).

brassdial

davidhome4Tiger Maple tall clock: Case by James Shott, dial by Kathi Seiwert, movement by DL. The case is inspired by the style of Montgomery County, PA. The maple is from PA.

dialjs davidhome3

Mahogany “Thomas Voight, Phil.” tall clock. It’s a reproduction of the clock in Thomas Jefferson’s library at Monticello. Dial by Kathi Seiwert, case by William Towne. Movement by DL, of course.

prestondial lindowdial

This is the first clock to bear David’s namesake, and one of only two made while he still lived in Paupack, PA. It was made when he was 28. The case was made by James Shott. David spun the dial, and it was painted by Martha Smallwood.

DLdial davidhome5
Drum head wall clock: Case by Mike Zuba, dial and movement are temporary – waiting for a regulator movement by Steve Franke.

gravity2
Gravity Regulator: Case by Dave Gunderson, movement by DL, pendulum by DL and Ashley Lindow Miller. The case is made of black walnut and eucalyptus burl.

gravity smclock

Tiger Maple Coffin Clock: Case by John Bartron from local wood. Dial by Martha Smallwood, movement by DL.

dial banjo

Case by Robert Hynes, tablets by Tom Moberg, Dial by Martha
Smallwood, and movement by David Lindow and Ashley Lindow.

banjodial banjopaint

 

Here are some photos from the workshop, while we were working on our mechanism. I was on pinion and gear-cutting duty. David made and assembled our barrel, among other things.

Don't worry - my hair is usually pulled back.

Don’t worry – my hair is usually pulled back.

pinionsdavidbarrelcaplathe finishedbarrelprocess capmillingcuttingpinionsdepthing

And I’m just throwing these in here because they’re beautiful and the piano roll has some good advice, but not for the faint of heart.

musicbox3 musicbox2 musicbox player

like you mean it

like you mean it

2 responses

  1. Positively gorgeous. For some reason, my eye is constantly drawn to that gravity regulator. I must have a thing for shiny skeletonized movements with nicely blued hands and screws.
    When do you get to build yours?

    Like

    • It is lovely isn’t it. David said he built that in about 200 hours over 2 weeks. I’m not sure I could keep up with him!

      Like

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