Brittany Nicole Cox

Angelsey Abbey's Pagoda Clock

My name is Brittany Nicole Cox; some people call me Nico. I am an Antiquarian Horologist,  which is a fancy way of say “specialized mechanic”. More specifically, I am watch and clock maker that specializes in new making and the conservation and restoration of automata and mechanical musical objects.

Automata can include flowers, figures, animals, birds and more – made movable through gear combinations. Mechanical musical objects can include music boxes, barrel organs, and larger objects such as clock tower carillons with massive bells. I also work with complicated clocks and watches including musical mechanisms or automata.

I find it difficult to give an answer when someone asks me how I found my calling, but I always come to the following conclusion: I had no choice in the matter! I feel like a magician or doctor bringing inanimate objects to life: birds that sing! Monkeys that dance! Tigers that roar!   Just to name a few.

I feel extremely privileged to have the opportunity to bring a little magic into everyday life, and be part of this extraordinary world where so many wonderful things happen in every moment. Thank you for visiting my blog – I hope you’ll find some magic in these pages too.

44 responses

  1. Hi Nico,
    I am writing from the Horological Society of New York. ( hs-ny.org ) We are the oldest watchmakers guild in the US. We would like to invite you to attend one of our lectures or to come and speak. Please have a look at our website.
    Best regards, Ed Hydeman

    Like

    • Hi Ed, Thank you so much for your consideration. I am familiar with your organization and am honoured to be considered for a lecture. It would be wonderful to attend a meeting if I find myself in New York. Please get in touch via email: bcox@mechanicalcurios.com to discuss this further. I look forward to hearing from you. Best regards, Brittany N Cox

      Like

  2. Dear Nico
    Love your work. As a dentist just retired I know that such work can be very tiring. May I suggest you use loupes and a light attachment so you will not suffer eye strain. It is a lifesaver for dentists. Check this out or contact me for more info.

    Like

    • Thank you so much! I’d be glad for any recommendations on eyewear you have. I do use loops, but am always interested in what others use.

      Like

  3. Your work and of course your self are facinating, if they leftme to repair like this I would never leave the shop, always one more to be saved, always one more to be tepaired to endure the ages. Your level there is traped in a construct, often the pinicale representation of a person’s life time erned skills, a mechanical creation ment be repared and maintined for lifetimes, a thing created with a conservation of materials though its permanace. These historical items tell so many stories and give and preserve so much instruction and knowlage as to almost bring about a desperation in myself to repair them in an unalterd correct form of repair as dictated by the signature of creation. That being said,it makes me smile that you are here to carry that on as my eyesight falters along with my hearing. I try to teach these things to my students, but few see it, and fewer would even dare to walk that path, but I still try.
    Steven M Anderson
    Aka Nik Gandt of SL

    Like

    • Thank you so much for the kind words Steven. I consider it a privilege to work on such beautiful and intricate objects.

      Like

  4. Hi Brittany!
    I have a musical box that belonged to my parents and it’s broken. I’m sure you can fix it but I’m not sure if the price will be too high for me.
    Let me know what to do next. I’m in Miami.
    Thank you!
    Lana

    Like

  5. It is important in every generation to have individuals who will keep these crafts alive, just as it is important to perform live classical music. I like Rolaag Minnesota where individuals are keeping 19th century farm equipment and steam engines running. The best exhibit is the steam driven carousel with complete calliope band .

    Like

  6. How does one study for antiquarian horogy?
    What you do is actually the basics for what we now call mechatronics.

    I’d like to learn more (don’t need another technical degree, though) about antiquarian horology.

    Like

    • Unfortunately there is not one place you can go to learn antiquarian horology. I am a specialist, but started off with watchmaking and then studied clockmaking. A list of resources can be found on the sidebar of the blog. That’s a good place to start.

      Like

  7. Hi Brittany ,
    I came across a video of buoy via facebook . I have always been fascinated with automaton and clock mechanisms . I see you are in Washington as well. Is it possible to see your work or a a tour ? I would find it more exciting then diving. Also reading a previous reply to another post where might we be able to see your pieces to purchase? Thank you for choosing your profession and keeping “Real” craftsmanship alive.

    Like

    • Thank you so much Roy! I am working on an e-commerce section of my page that I hope to incorporate soon. Diving sounds very fascinating. I have always admired cave divers – as I enjoy a bit of spelunking myself. I don’t currently offer tours, but do teach classes.

      Like

  8. Hi Brittany. I saw what you do in a short video. If I won the lottery, I would love to learn what you do. It would help satisfy the mechanical and creative urges that lie undeveloped and tug within me. It is awesome that you preserve the art and mechanical wonders of a time that has moved on. I hope your craft allows you to continue what you do and also allow you to enjoy it at the same time for many years to come.

    Like

    • Hi Dustin, It’s never too late to learn! I am still learning every day. I can’t imagine my life without these things – so I’m sure I will continue the work as long as I am able. Thanks so much!

      Like

  9. Your work makes me want to visit you and listen to your restoration work over coffee and see some of these magical wonders. I found a video by accident and it is inspiring. Thank you for bringing back old mechanics and keeping them alive.

    Like

    • I do have things that I have made for sale – such as novelty spinning tops that draw, mineral stands, and other guilloche items. I do not have any antiquities for sale.

      Like

  10. I AM HONORED TO HAVE READ ABOUT YOU . YOU ARE A GREATNESS FROM THE PAST . THAT LIGHTENS THE FUTURE OF OUR PAST . THANK YOU !

    Like

  11. I watched your video through a Facebook link, and visited your web site. The world is a better place because you exist in it to help us remember what it was.

    Like

  12. Nico, I just viewed the video about you and your work. I am curious. Where did you get your training and schooling? My husband and have collected clocks for more than 30 years and we’d like to get more training in fixing our antique clocks.

    Like

    • Hi Caroljeanne, I went through 9 years of training as a jeweler, watchmaker, clockmaker, and conservator. All of my education can be seen on my CV – a link to which is at the bottom of the about page. Thank you for your interest!

      Like

  13. Aloha Nico,
    What a great piece about you and your work. It’s great to see this work being done outside of Switzerland; especially in the USA. I’ve spent many hours at the IMH museum in La Chaux de Fonds staring at their collection- I agree: it’s the original AI. I created the worlds smallest atomic clock but I’m isolated here on Kauai. I really wish I had someone like you to collaborate with and get help with the difficulties of building such tiny machines by hand. I’d love to speak with you further if you have a chance. All the best and please keep these treasures alive!

    Like

    • Hi John, Thank you! It’s been a long journey, but I feel extremely privileged to work with the objects I do. They have the most wonderful objects that collection! I’d love to see your atomic clock! Feel free to write me an email at bcox@mechanicalcurios.com to talk about your projects!

      Like

  14. Thank you for what you do! I recently became fascinated with automatons (and have always had an interest in antique clocks). They are indeed magical transformations of inanimate objects made to mimick living things so beautiful. I also love the old ways of how things were made, old tools and traditional techniques. What you do is truly unique and inspiring. What a great way to reconnect with the past. If I were to be a mechanic, I would want to be a 17th century mechanic like you!

    Like

    • Thank you so much for the very kind words! I really appreciate it. I’m so glad we share these interests – please stay engaged and curious with horology! The world is a beautiful place.

      Like

  15. My dad started working on clocks as a hobby while he was in Germany. Some years later he got me interested, and I learned how to repair/fix mantle and wall clocks. I saw the recent video posted. You are really AWESOME.

    Like

    • Thank you so much Michael! I’m so glad you grew up knowing these things. They are precious and the world needs stewards!

      Like

  16. Brittany,

    I saw your story on CNN. Fantastic! My son is going to college to become a mechanical engineer and I plan to share with him.

    PLEASE keep up the great work.

    All the best,

    Ron

    Like

  17. My grandfather taught me to work with my hands in his shop and now I work on helicopters. I admire the work you do and would love to see you work I. Your shop for a month. Your work is too cool .

    Like

    • Thanks so much for the kind words! I love stories like this – how wonderful that you went on to work on helicopters!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s