Horology is Hot

Really… I know that sounds kind of like a buzzword… but horology is hot! People are engaged with horology, cultural heritage and preservation right now! And it’s awesome! I am so excited that friends and colleagues are getting so much attention.

My favorite object in the world (!!) is headed to London to be featured in a new exhibition on Robots!

 

The clockmakers museum also moved to a new gallery at the Science Museum in London. Now folks visiting the Science Museum will have the exposure to a collection that holds such an incredible and rich history for horology. It’s all such wonderful news and momentum for our field.

And to top it off, Atlas Obscura just published on article on yours truly….you can read it here!

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Let’s keep it going! Get involved! Be engaged! Study! Create! Explore! You know where to reach me if you need a push.

 

 

Newsletter & Classes!

Let me start by saying, very best wishes for the New Year!

screen-shot-2017-01-19-at-5-38-14-pmTo start the year off, I’ve put together a newsletter containing shop updates. It’s basically a summary of happenings and the latest offerings at the workshop. It will cover upcoming classes, new making whimsies, featured conservation projects, riddles, and more. If you’d like to check it out or subscribe, you can do so here. Below are some excerpts from the newsletter. Don’t worry, I wont flood your inbox with stuff; it will be a rather infrequent publication.

The exciting news is that I have finally put together some class dates! Student numbers are very small this time around based on student feedback. We’ve set the limit at 4 to 6 people per class – so everyone gets more time on the machines and more one on one tuition. David Lindow will be  joining me in March for some advanced level classes. See class descriptions and sign up here!

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Engine Turning Event Extended

Hi All! A quick announcement :

The tickets already sold out for the first engine turning session with Atlas Obscura – so they’ve added another. It now only has three spaces left – so if you’re interested I’d sign up while there’s still a spot or two! You can still sign up here.

Hope to see you there!

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Atlas Obscura Event on Engine Turning

Hello readers! I’m excited to announce I’ll be hosting an engine turning taster at my workshop in partnership with Atlas Obscura. If you’re not familiar with their online magazine – it’s very entertaining. In an effort to educate, inspire, and share the weird and wonderful things in this strange world, they host events and regularly publish articles on esoteric subjects.

Our engine turning workshop is quite small, so register early if you’ve been curious about engine turning, but are unsure about taking a full class or just want to give it a try. You can sign up here.

In other news – The Ornamental Turners International conference in Denver this year was an amazing time. We are working out hosting the next symposium here in Seattle for 2018. Stay tuned for details on that.

And so, to get you excited about the marvels of engine and ornamental turning, here are few photos of some recent pieces I’ve made and the incredible objects produced by both members and speakers that attended this year’s OTI event.

I’ve been loving the moire pattern lately – and trying out all manor of phasing variations.

 

These unbelievable kaleidoscopes by Bill Brinker are just gorgeous! Look at the incredible vibrantly COLORED enamel he has done over such fine and intricate guilloche work. If you take a minute to watch the videos – those are real gemstones inside suspended in an optical solution.

 

 

 

And here Jean-Claude Charpignon takes us through one of his elaborate Coburg Ivory inspired pieces in miniature. He is truly doing some incredible things with fixed-tool work. The video below demonstrates the movement of the top. A ball, inside of a ball, inside of a ball, inside of a ball, inside of a ball….. all cut out of one piece!

 

 

Here are some photos from the gallery space where members set out their work. So many beautiful objects and fine craftsmanship in one place. Unfortunately, not all of the craftsmen who attended the show are represented here – that just means for you enthusiasts – you’ll have to attend the 2018 symposium!

For the Love of American Clocks

Hello readers! I hope you all are enjoying a wonderful holiday season! David took Steve and I on a little study tour to see some private collections. Partly, this was an attempt to engender in me a love for American clocks. As I specialize in English and European objects, I am not as familiar with American styles and makers. There are more visits scheduled to see clocks by Pennsylvania maker David Rittenhouse and others. American horology has a fascinating history. It’s brief compared to that of Europe, but seems quite rich in ingenuity over a relatively short period of time. From the long case (or tall case) clocks of early settlers, to the Hamilton marine chronometers, Bulova mechanical detonators and the Apollo 11 mission timers, to the first quartz clock and watch and more – there is quite a fascinating story! The NAWCC library is a fantastic resource for anyone interested in delving into American horology. They’ve kept on file all records of Marine chronometers made and sold by the Hamilton Watch Co. – this is just one of the gems hidden in their archives. Nearer to the end of the post are pictures of David’s gorgeous MADE lathe. I couldn’t resist. I’d rather buy that machine than a house (clearly my priorities are in order). They are in the process of completing one at David’s workshop. I hope to post photos of it once it’s finished. There is also a small escapement model David built – quite sweet. We are looking at making some decorated versions and developing a kit for this, so one could build and finish it on their own. Lastly are some little movements for dwarf tall clocks that David’s daughter made.

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