I’ve Published a Book!

Gosh – can you believe it? Well, I hardly can…I’m so very excited to announce the publication of  Sacred Geometry – a 16th Century Coloring Book.

In an effort to engage a more diverse group of individuals with the incredible designs the rose engine can generate, I approached ornamental turner Al Collins with the idea of a coloring book. Seeing that these patterns could be enjoyed by people of all ages and backgrounds, I wanted to seize on the opportunity of the coloring book boom and found the perfect platform! In this highly accessible form, I hope turners and enthusiasts might take the opportunity to share these designs with others and their loved ones. The symmetry of the patterns drawn on paper to those turned on a box are made clear and the art form relatable to a broader audience. It is my hope this unique compilation will spark both inspiration and curiosity in equal measure.

– Here are some photos of the original machine drawings –

It was quite the challenge researching publishing platforms, papers weights, bindings, etc. Eventually I settled on self publishing and worked with Evolution Press for the covers & Abracadabra printers in Seattle. There were many proofs and edits along the way – such as ordering and pairing the patterns and picking out the binding.

 

Now that all is said and done, I’m really happy with the results!

The front and back covers are letterpress. The front features a pattern from the book in copper – imitating the optical properties of guilloche work. The back displays a letterpress of the MADE lathe technical drawing. The binding is copper wire, allowing the book to lay flat as you color. The 72 unique patterns are printed on 180lb uncoated white paper – so your coloring utensils won’t bleed through and colors stay true. The book is limited to 300 copies and was handmade here in Seattle, Washington! Keeping it local!

For the technically interested, I’ve put together a book of receipts. This lists the steps for how to generate each pattern in the book on the MADE lathe or similar patterns on any rose engine.

And because I’m so excited about this project and wanted to offer something super special, I compiled a limited special edition of the book – hand signed by the authors + the MADE lathe team. It includes the book of receipts, a hand dyed copper, cotton tote bag, a set of colored pencils, and an engine turned bookmark – all hand made at the Memoria Technica Workshop. They are hand numbered & limited to 24 copies.

If you’d like to snag one – they’re available here!

You can see photos of the finished version below along with some photos of the special edition perks – like an engine turned bookmark I made.

 

MADE in the Making

If you’ve been reading my blog then you’ll have encountered photos of the gorgeous MADE Ornamental Rose Engine by David Lindow. Well… there’s now a website with tons of incredible photos of the lathe and the process – a brochure(!) – and the whole story of its creation. Check it out! Here’s a recent post they did showing photos of the lathe in production….

“An incredible amount of work goes into the making of each lathe. Every part is manufactured and finished by hand here in the United States. We thought we’d share some photos of the process with you.”

Source: MADE in the Making

Seeing the MADE lathe & the MJT

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Last week in between classes David and I had the privilege of visiting The Museum of Jurassic Technology and taking a field trip to Al Collins workshop. Al is one of the developers of the MADE lathe and is in the thick of some fascinating research. He has developed some rosettes in an attempt to regain lost techniques used by the ornamental turners of previous centuries. He has made huge strides and is producing pieces inspired by the Coburg Ivories.

You should also check out the work of Tristan Duke – a modern wizard in holography. I can’t wait to see what comes of potential collaborations between David and Tristan. Given that engine turning or Guilloché can be considered the precursor to holographic technology – there is some discussion about producing scratch abrasive holograms using David’s rose engine. Talk about exciting! Below you can see some of the incredible experiments and holograms Tristan is working on.

For the Love of American Clocks

Hello readers! I hope you all are enjoying a wonderful holiday season! David took Steve and I on a little study tour to see some private collections. Partly, this was an attempt to engender in me a love for American clocks. As I specialize in English and European objects, I am not as familiar with American styles and makers. There are more visits scheduled to see clocks by Pennsylvania maker David Rittenhouse and others. American horology has a fascinating history. It’s brief compared to that of Europe, but seems quite rich in ingenuity over a relatively short period of time. From the long case (or tall case) clocks of early settlers, to the Hamilton marine chronometers, Bulova mechanical detonators and the Apollo 11 mission timers, to the first quartz clock and watch and more – there is quite a fascinating story! The NAWCC library is a fantastic resource for anyone interested in delving into American horology. They’ve kept on file all records of Marine chronometers made and sold by the Hamilton Watch Co. – this is just one of the gems hidden in their archives. Nearer to the end of the post are pictures of David’s gorgeous MADE lathe. I couldn’t resist. I’d rather buy that machine than a house (clearly my priorities are in order). They are in the process of completing one at David’s workshop. I hope to post photos of it once it’s finished. There is also a small escapement model David built – quite sweet. We are looking at making some decorated versions and developing a kit for this, so one could build and finish it on their own. Lastly are some little movements for dwarf tall clocks that David’s daughter made.

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Engine Turning Class No. 2

We ran two engine turning seminars while David was here, so I thought I’d share some photos from the second group. We saw some really beautiful pattern developments on day two. I didn’t capture as many this time around, but here are some photos from this class and a few of the students. You can see more photos and info about the first class we ran here.

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