Craft – skill in making

Hello readers! Another round of updates as things move along at Memoria Technica.

I just finished up a pretty long stretch of classes at the shop. David Lindow joined me in teaching three of these – our intermediate and advanced levels. The results are really inspiring. I love seeing all of the different combinations students come up with. Check out the little video clips at the bottom of the photos. They really show off the glittery optical effects of the guilloché. The photos were taken throughout the series of classes – from Beginner’s turning up through Advanced.



The Horological Lecture Series is going strong! On May 15th, I hosted the second lecture in the series at the Stimson Green Mansion with the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation, which was another sold out event. David gave his presentation: The History of the Rose Engine from Kings to Craftsmen. It was a beautiful evening and I am very thankful to David for giving such an in depth and fascinating talk. I hope you’ll join us for the next one in August, which will be delivered by Master Goldsmith and Horologist Philip Peck.


In between all of this and my bench work, I completed the second edition of the Sacred Geometry coloring book with Al Collins. I’m excited to say it is now available for purchase. This edition is a little more robust than the first with over 20 bonus pages. The front and back are finished in white foil. The back features the MADE lathe technical drawing, with the front embellished with the same pattern as the first edition, but in silver foil. The binding is a white metal spiral to match the foil and allows the book to lay flat. I’m surprised at how different it feels when compared with the first edition. I’m still working on the receipt book to incorporate the new patterns, but that will be finished soon for those of you interested in the recipes.


The shop was also featured in the local Seattle news. That was a lot of fun to put together with Malia Karlinksy of Seattle Refined.


And! last, but not least, come see me this Friday at Seattle’s chapter of Creative Mornings. If you’re not familiar with Creative Mornings, I highly recommend checking them out. They host a free monthly event with breakfast and a short talk featuring a creative theme, designed to get you up, inspired, and off to work on time. This month’s theme is Craft. I feel honored to be Seattle’s speaker.

Engine Turning Classes May 2018

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I’m excited to announce the latest schedule for engine turning classes is now up and registration is open!

Register HERE.


David Lindow will be coming out to teach intermediate and advanced classes with me this May after I start off the month with Beginner’s Turning. He will be bringing a Lindow Rose engine equipped with higher amplitude rosettes, allowing students to try a different machine and produce more dynamic patterns than what my Leinhards are currently capable of.

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David will also be giving the second lecture in the series at the Stimson-Green Mansion, entitled “The History of the Rose Engine from Kings to Craftsmen.”

Tickets now available HERE. 

About the series:

Lectures are held on a quarterly basis, the second Tuesday of the month, and are open to anyone with an interest in horology and decorative arts.

Join us for a journey through the history of science, art, and mechanical timekeeping. This series features guest speakers from many disciplines related to aspects of the horological field, including engine turning, mechanical magic, ornamental turning, celestial bodies and navigation, and the art of the goldsmith.

To submit topics you would like to explore or if you are interested in sponsoring the series, please contact us at: info@mechanicalcurios.com”


It’s not too late to become a sponsor of the series. All proceeds go to venue fees, speaker fees, as well as food & beverages. The series would not be possible without our sponsors! We are very grateful for the support. Check out our sponsorship packages HERE.


 

Advanced Engine Turning

Hi All! So we finally finished up the last of our engine turning classes this month. It was great fun seeing how the student work developed over the sessions, as many students enrolled in more than one. With more complex projects, students singled in on a specific idea. A lot of time was spent making sure surfaces were dialed in flat and true. Students worked in silver, copper, and other materials. Here are the results!

 

David and I want to say thank you to all of our students and the support! We’re already planning our next series of classes and look forward to meeting our future attendees!

Until next time!

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Intermediate Engine Turning I – Group 2

This was a great class with students bringing many ideas and projects. Casey Burns, a local flute maker, decided to add engine turning to his instruments. You can see the pieces he turned in the photos below – check out his website for the finished flutes! Two watchmakers also enrolled in this session trying out some exciting concepts for dials and pendants – incorporating off center work and some challenging patterns. A long time ornamental turner and enthusiast also signed up looking for new inspiration in old traditions. The results from the class are stunning.

Photos from Beginners Engine Turning

It was a great group – a woodturner, a watchmaker, a watch collector, & a metals conservator. I love seeing the new patterns people come up with using traditional ideas. It always yields interesting results when people approach the practice from different backgrounds  ! I’ve only got one space left in each of the three remaining classes, so there’s still a chance to sign up if you’re interested. Sign up here.