Day No.16 – Pantograph Machines

There are a number of beautiful Pantograph engraving machines in the workshop. While working today, I moved some flat aluminum stock that was sitting on top of the Leinhard engraving machine. Underneath I found this:

The Harmon Bros.

The Harmon Bros.

 

Lienhard Pantograph engraving machine

Lienhard Pantograph engraving machine

 

I wonder if Dennis had it set up to engrave a sign…

The other engraving machines aren’t as heavy as the Lienhard, although this little one below seems very versatile, allowing you to suspend objects in the vice while engraving.

The manual claims you could engrave a curved silver vase!

 

Versatile Pantograph machine

Versatile Pantograph machine

 

The manual

The manual

 

A page from the manual

A page from the manual

 

This last Pantograph machine is the most primitive, but for me the most intriguing. I saw pieces of what looks like another in the basement.

P1130213

 

 

Day No.7 – Now that’s a demagnetizer !

A Boettger and Wittig Demagnetizer, a watch was placed inside of the core and the slide was then moved in and out to change the polarity of the magnet, as described in patent number 699863:  The slide and comb thereon constitute a pole changer, and in practice the same is actuated to cause frequent reverses of the direction of current that goes through the electromagnet. A magnetized watch, tool, or other device is placed in the hollow core of the electromagnet… the pole changer is operated to effect its function… the result being demagnetization of said device.

Boettger and Wittig Demagnetizer

 

A Boettger and Wittig Demagnetizer, a watch was placed inside of the core and the slide was then moved in and out to change the polarity of the magnet, as described in patent number 699863:  The slide and comb thereon constitute a pole changer, and in practice the same is actuated to cause frequent reverses of the direction of current that goes through the electromagnet. A magnetized watch, tool, or other device is placed in the hollow core of the electromagnet… the pole changer is operated to effect its function… the result being demagnetization of said device.

The watch is placed inside

 

Patent US699863

Patent US699863

 

To use, a watch is placed inside of the core; the slide is then moved in and out to change the polarity of the magnet, as described in patent number 699863:

The slide and comb thereon constitute a pole changer, and in practice the same is actuated to cause frequent reverses of the direction of current that goes through the electromagnet. A magnetized watch, tool, or other device is placed in the hollow core of the electromagnet… the pole changer is operated to effect its function… the result being demagnetization of said device.

pic2467a

Oddly enough, or maybe not oddly at all given the circumstances, Dennis had a collection of demagnetizers. This was my by far my favorite though.

Here are some other goodies from today’s work:

P1120802

Gorgeously golden aged lacquer on an antique microscope

 

P1120808

Pocket meter with original leather case

 

P1120829

A sample of the level collection

 

P1120793

Lovely little drill press

 

P1120796

Extra Schaublin 102 headstock

 

P1120773

Engine turned background

 

P1120771

Watchmakers lathe transmission drives

 

 

Day No.5 – leaks

Today the roof was inspected and deemed beyond repair. The options are limited, so we’ve decided to have the roof tarped in the meantime. New leaks have started and the buckets are filling fast. I spent much of the day navigating the leaks, as we experienced a torrential down pour.

New leaks

New leaks

Water pooling beneath the safe

Water pooling beneath the safe

In between emptying buckets, I found a dozen or so small antique alcohol lamps of varying sizes.

A modest collection

A modest collection

Under a bench and under some other stuff I found what looks like a second complete Lorch lathe in its original box.

The 8mm Lorch lathe

The 8mm Lorch lathe

This was sitting near by:

Hand wheel

Hand wheel

There are several lovely glass bell jars of many shapes and sizes. Here are a few…

Bell jars

Bell jars

and of course more clocks and bits.

P1120737P1120736

In the shop – Day No. 2

I have spent two days in the shop. What an amazing place. Everywhere I look, some treasure is hiding. Here are some photos of today’s finds.

P1120565

Patek Philippe Quartz Clock

Patek Philippe Naviquartz clock in original box with paperwork

This gem was hiding under a bunch of bubble wrap in a bag in a box under more wrapping material and other boxes under a bench. This is why one should always check EVERYTHING!

French lighthouse clocks, clockmaking, watchmaking

French Lighthouse clocks!! I am smitten with these.

These gorgeous (albeit, fragments) Lighthouse clocks were on a tray on the floor of a small cupboard. They are missing almost everything, but I am hopeful I will find the tops to their lanterns and bases somewhere in the haystack.

Banjolele!

Banjolele! A project for when this is all over.

A gum tape machine dispenser - still works too.

A gum tape machine dispenser – still works too.

But look closely at the next find…………..

Do you see it?

Do you see it?

P1120588

Ok – here is a closer look

—————————————–>

Now do you see it?

Yes, this original document contains the signatures of many prominent horologists, and among them is Louis Breguet.

Here are some photos of the front room, which Dennis did most of his work in.

The machining side

The machining side

Watchmaking benches - original metal handles, hardwood, and built in staking sets.

Watchmaking benches – original metal handles, hardwood, and built in staking sets.

Let's not forget the antique rounding up tool.

Let’s not forget the antique rounding up tool.

Today I accomplished my main goal of clearing out and organizing one of the smaller rooms and its contents.

The room emptied of the contents - except the small french clock hiding in the corner.

The room emptied of the contents – except the small french clock hiding in the corner.

Parts and materials from Bestfit, Longines, Sarthchild, etc.

Parts and materials from Bestfit, Longines, Swarthchild, etc.

These were all moved from the little room pictured above. Each drawer or every other is separate and has to be moved individually and restacked. They fit together with a pin system, but sometimes the pins don’t match from unit to unit. This can be troublesome when the stack gets too high!

Anyhow, I’m off to bed. It’s been a long day and there are many more to come. I can’t wait.

Old & New

I was recently offered the post of finishing the work I began on the 1765 George Pyke clock at Temple Newsam House I mentioned in a previous blog entry. You can read about it here.

George Pyke clock, automata, automaton, clockmaking, watchmaking, brittany cox, nico cox, temple Newsam House, Ian fraser

.

Unfortunately this old path is not the future path. It was extremely difficult to set aside my feelings of attachment to this project and the desire to finish what I started. As previously mentioned, three years of prep work, grant applications, research, and multiple visits to assess the condition went into putting the proposal together that I presented to West Dean. I owe so much to Ian Fraser, the head Conservator at Temple Newsam, for all of his hard work and support on this project.

George Pyke clock, automata, automaton, clockmaking, watchmaking, brittany cox, nico cox, temple Newsam House, Ian fraser

Dial

The reason my path has changed course is the following: I have been offered the opportunity of handling the estate of the late horologist Dennis E. Harmon. A friend of George Daniels, and a man who did everything in the old way, making his own pigments from scratch for his enameling work and grinding raw diamonds down for polishing powders. His workshop is painted with the original green paint from the (long closed) Bulova watchmaking factory. This man was one of the Greats and is missed by many. He is the best friend, tutor, and all around most amazing person I never met.

Dennis E. Harmon

Dennis E. Harmon

From what I understand, Dennis and his brother were a force to be reckoned with – traveling to auctions far and wide, buying up anything and everything horological. If the Harmon Brothers showed, you were out of luck.

His workshop includes, but is not limited to the following:

A Rose Engine

A Straight-Line Engine

Schaublin 70 + all accessories

Schaublin 102 + all accessories

Schaublin 120 + all accessories

Pantographs

Profile Projectors

Watchmakers lathes + accessories

Scientific Instruments

And everything else you might ever wish for you in your most decadent horological dreams

Here are some photos:

IMG_3208 IMG_3174 IMG_3195 IMG_3185 IMG_3231 IMG_3246

 
In addition there are old wooden tool chests filled to the brim, bulls eye crystals, industrial benches + light fixtures + cabinets, books, and more.
 
 
I have been hired to catalogue and sell off the shop. Stay tuned for updates and a catalogue that will be uploaded on an additional page with price lists and items for sale. There will be a series of onsite sales later this year. Get in touch if you’re interested, but more information will be coming soon. I will be relocating temporarily to the East Coast to handle the estate. I aim to return to Seattle by the summer with many wonderful additions to my workshop.
 
Today is day 1 on the job. Hello New York; it’s nice to see you again.